If you want to sail better in light winds you need to master the four things which are listed below. Attitude:  is the biggest hurdle to overcome, you should not fear light air just because you have sucked at it in the past. Relish the opportunity to sail against light air specialists, those that have thrashed you in the past, and treat...
Article collated from excerpts of an article authored by Colin Gowland regarding Handling Gusts and Lulls - International Sailing Academy https://internationalsailingacademy.com/   Many sailors have poor gust response and in gusts, there is a tendency to “fight” the boat with hiking and often too much steering to control power. In keelboats, we often see the boat heeling too much, the helmsman pinching...
In the last few minutes before the gun goes there is plenty happening. You must be observant of what is going on up the course as well as finding a spot on the line to accommodate you and your plan. Keep an eye on boats that may have already started on your course, but if you are the only fleet...
  In all sailboat races, you must sail toward better pressure as more wind velocity almost always means more speed.  On the course look for darker water as changes in wind velocity are a lot easier to see than changes in direction. More wind creates more ripples on the water, and these appear darker because of how they reflect light. Be careful though...
          Perhaps the most important skill that separates the best sailors from the rest of the fleet is their ability to see the wind. The reason that this is critical is that it enables them to consistently get to the windier side of the course and thus sail faster than their competition.  Obviously, no one can actually see the wind but there are...
An excerpt below from an interview that I did on the subject of Current and How to Plan for it with Professional Sailor and International Sailing Coach Andrew Palfrey. It’s important to know what the tide is doing, what observations do you make on the course in assisting you to know where to go? Ideally, you have pre-gamed the strategy...
                        Part 2 of the interview that I did on the subject of weather and how it affects your sailing with Professional Sailor and International Sailing Coach Andrew Palfrey. Do you take notice of the clouds on the course and how do they affect your decision making? Yes, absolutely....
Because I am not a student of the weather but now knowing what I should have realised much earlier after speaking with a lot of high achieving competing sailors, that no race planning is complete without gathering as much information as possible prior to heading out to race. To that end, I have put together a 2 part...
Looking at the water on light air days with little cloud cover, it's easier to see a puff approaching because the extra wind causes the surface of the water to ripple and change to a darker colour plus it will be moving away from the source which will tell you whether it's an approaching lift or knock. It's always a...
Oscillating shifts are the most common type of wind pattern, so if you’re not sure what the wind is doing assume it is oscillating until you discover otherwise. It’s very important to figure out whether the wind shifts will be oscillating or persistent, but this is not always easy todo. There are some visual clues (listed below) that often mean...

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