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Competitive Sailing Sailing To Win Yacht Racing

Twelve Actions That Will Improve Your Sailing Skills

 

You are unlikely to win every race you enter but you can learn something new every time you go out on the water. For the champions of our sport, learning is one of the most rewarding aspects of competition.

  1. Race as many different boats and classes as possible. Different boats react differently concerning changes in sail trim, boat handling, and reaction to waves. Sailing in a large variety of boats will deepen your understanding of what controls do, steering outcomes, and crew requirements.
  2. Watch Races. You will learn plenty from watching races from a coach boat or reviewing videos of sailing events. Sometimes you will learn more than you would have learned if you were actually competing.
  3. Champions are happy to share their knowledge so don’t be too shy to ask questions in the boat park after a race or in the bar.
  4. Two boat training with predetermined exercises and outcomes is a great way to learn quickly about what you need to do to get as fast as possible. This is especially useful in one-design boats but can also work with two different types of boats with known performance parameters.
  5. There are plenty of seminars, webinars, and Zoom meetings that you can attend and many have interactive Q&A sessions where you can ask for further clarification of concepts that you may not have fully grasped.
  6. Discuss a race from start to finish with your crew or even reconstruct it in your head and note down details and learnings for future reference.
  7. Keep a journal that you enter after each race or regatta. Things to record include the boat set up, conditions at the venue including wind speed, sea state, current, size of the fleet, and the sails you used. Record other factors relevant that will help you analyze and remember what worked and what didn’t.
  8. One of the easiest ways to get faster in your chosen class is to copy the top performers in your fleet. Watch how they prepare, how they set their boat up, when they leave the beach and what they do before the start.
  9. Sail with the best sailors from your fleet on their boats and occasionally get them to sail on your boat with you. Any feedback they give you about your boat’s setup will be invaluable. 
  10. As part of your journal, keep photos of great ideas and layouts on other boats. Keep a video library to study sail trim and sailing techniques. This does not need to be restricted to your class and a lot can be learned from other types of boats.
  11. Save articles from magazines and read them again and again, join relevant sailing websites and forums and be proactive in commenting and asking questions.
  12. Get involved in your clubs learn to sail program and share your knowledge. It is often said that “you don’t really know something until you can explain it to someone else”

#sailingtowin #sailtowin #sail #sailboatrace #yachtrace #sailcoach #yacht

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Competitive Sailing Sailing To Win Yacht Racing

How to Approach a Regatta in Big or Small Fleets

 

Interview with Glenn Bourke to give us some insight into championship and regatta strategy. Glenn is currently the CEO of the wildly successful Hamilton Island home of Hamilton Island race week. Not only is Glenn a successful businessman but he is a high achieving competitive sailor with multiple Olympic, World and National championship successes to his name.

  • Brett – Do you approach a regatta differently in big or small fleets?

Glenn – A little bit. I guess I’ve predominately done most of my sailing career in big fleets. And I certainly have a system that I employ in big fleets, and some of it’s applicable to small fleets, and some it’s not so applicable.

For example, before technology in boats, I used to start maybe a third or a quarter down from the favoured end of the line, or a quarter up from the favoured end of the line if it was for the pin.

The reason for that was that usually there’s a bulge at the top end of the line or the bottom end of the line if it’s favoured quite a bit.

You can generally get yourself clear air and away off the line and not be seen by the committee boat if you start a little bit away from that mad pack that generally goes over the line early.

So you might call it a conservative start, it’s probably not the Hail Mary start, but it’s one whereby you tuck yourself away and if the whole fleet goes, you’re probably not seen from an OCS or maybe you’re not an OCS because you’re behind the line, but they’re bulged out underneath you.

You’re still clear and going, but you’re not in the ruckus of the chaos at the end of the big fleet. 

In smaller fleets, I think you can have the opportunity to be a bit more aggressive and to take the favoured end of the line because there’s not as much carnage there, and you can pre-manoeuvre and do whatever else you need to do.

Some of it depends on who is your main competition, if it’s a small fleet and everybody’s even, then you want to get the best start. You want to get into the first shift first.

If it’s a small fleet, and there’s one other competitor that’s tough, you want to make sure that you get a slightly better start than that person so that you can control them up the first beat and take advantage of getting off the line a little bit better.

  • Brett – What are some big fleet basic strategies? If you’re sailing in a regatta, obviously, it’s going to be a number of races. 

Glenn – There’s a number of them. First of all, you’ve got to be fast. In a big fleet, if you want to get to the front end of the fleet, you have to be fast.

If you can jump out of the start and clear yourself, tack across a group of boats and get into a really clear position, you ought to take that opportunity and do it straight away.

It depends where you end up at the first mark as to what your strategy might be after that.

You can’t compete in a big fleet unless you’re fast because you’re going to get spat out and then you are just going to be looking for crumbs on the table rather than being assertive in your strategy or where you’re putting the boat compared to the fleet.

It also changes from the beginning of the regatta to the end of the regatta.

At the end of the regatta, you’ve got to be more perfect. At the end of the regatta, you’ve got to watch your opposition.

You make a transitional strategy from being very fast, off the line well, getting to the first shift and trying to get around the top mark in good order.

At the beginning of the regatta, you are watching where your competitors are, being generally in the right place, being generally a bit more conservative and covering their moves rather than necessarily trying to get the perfect regatta or the perfect race under your belt.

#sailingtowin #sailtowin #sailing #yachtracing #sailboatracing #sail

CHAMPIONS TIPS, SECRETS & STRATEGIES

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Competitive Sailing Sailing To Win Yacht Racing

Rig Tune Relationship to Get Better Performance.

Firstly, I would like to correct an error in last weeks Blog regarding using the compass to establish Line bias. Phil Crebbin, a UK 470 Olympian kindly pointed this out and has provided the correct method which is copied below in bold.

Everybody knows that it is the wind direction vs the line direction that defines the bias of the line (subject only to other things like any variation of current at each end of the line, of course). The direction to the first mark has absolutely nothing to do with it, except in the extreme case when the mark can be laid in one, without having to tack.

One clear way of demonstrating this is if you have a shifty wind, with the line laid to be approximately on the average wind direction. Say that the wind is periodically shifting ca. 10 degrees on either side of this mean direction. When the wind is on its maximum left shift of 10 degrees, clearly the port end of the line is now favoured by that 10 degrees. Conversely, when the wind is on its maximum right shift of 10 degrees, the starboard end of the line is now favoured by that 10 degrees. 

 RIG TUNE –The four main elements to rig tune.

Mast Rake is measured from the masts vertical position to how far aft that the mast is angled. Angling the mast aft shifts the power aft and forces the bow to windward and creates weather helm.

Forestay length determines how much rake you have and how much rake a boat needs to generate the right amount of weather helm is a function of hydrodynamics being hull form, keel shape and placement (or in the case of a dinghy, centreboard position or rake if your class has a pivoting board).

In most one-design racing classes, sailmakers and class stalwarts have put a lot of time figuring out what works best and creating tuning guides that specify headstay lengths and thus rake for different conditions.

These are readily available by doing a Google search of your class.

Mast Bend –  After setting the rake turn your mind to mast bend. Mast bend changes the mainsail shape, the more bend the flatter the mainsail which in turn gives less power. 

No matter what type of rig you have, you want to start with a little mast bend or pre-bend and this is the amount of bend you have with no backstay tension.

Lengthening the headstay increases the bending moment and adds pre-bend and this is why it’s important to set rake first.

If your mainsail develops diagonal wrinkles from the clew up to the luff,  you are over-bending the mast for the amount of luff curve in your mainsail.

Athwartship Tuning the rig must be centred in the boat otherwise performance will be different on each tack. Using the main haliard and taking the loose end to the gunwale on each side will give you a side to side reference.

The tension on the shrouds needs to be firm, the same on both sides and if you are sailing a dinghy, the use of a tension gauge when setting up on the beach gives great results. 

In a keelboat, when sailing in 10-12 knots of breeze, sight up the aft face of the mast to check whether the tip is falling off or not. If it is, you need more upper tension.

The next step on a boat with lowers or with multiple spreaders and diagonals is that you need to work on the lowers and/or diagonals next.  

In over 10 knots, you want the mast to be straight but for more power in light air, you can let the middle of the mast sag a little to leeward to increase the depth in the mainsail. 

It is common in one-design classes to ease tension on the lowers (and diagonals if relevant) in light air to create a smooth sag.

 Headstay Sag  When the headstay sags, the headsail becomes fuller and more powerful, which is great in light conditions. As the breeze builds, you’ll want to reduce the amount of sag as much as possible to de-power the boat and help with pointing.  

When you pull on the backstay, or in the case of swept spreaders with no backstay, sheet tension and/or pulling on the sidestays (if they are adjustable) will initially tighten the headstay, but because you are also compressing the rig, the more backstay or rig tension you pull on, in turn, cause mast bend which increases headstay sag.

To counteract this some classes have a strut or chocks to lessen the bend and keep the headstay sag to a minimum and in other boats, you have check stays to change the bend and thus control headstay sag to match the rig and sails to the prevailing conditions.

#sailingtowin #sailtowin #sailboatrace #yachtracing #sailfaster #sailing

SAILING TO WIN!

 

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Competitive Sailing Sailing To Win Yacht Racing

How To Work Out The Favoured End Without Instruments

Getting a great start in clear air can be the most important part of your race and knowing the favoured end and determining how much it is favoured will help you settle on your starting strategy.

Some of the many considerations to ensure a great start are current, where other boats are congregating, the size of the fleet, wind speed and any anticipated shifts.

Of course, there are many other factors to take into account as well so a lot of thought and preparation needs to be given in the lead up to the gun going off.

Instruments to ping the line (if legal in your class) can be of enormous benefit but I believe that you should also be able to use your compass only to work out the line and a couple of methods are set out below.

Going Head to Wind on the Middle of the Line: To carry this out, sail down the line from the boat end about a couple of boat lengths to leeward, when you get to the middle of the line, ease the sails and point directly into the wind. Once you are on the line and at right angles to it, see which end the bow is pointing to, that will be the favoured end. 

A variation of this is to carry out the same procedure but a number of lengths below the line. Doing this will make it easier to determine which end the bow is pointing to and will also keep you clear of heavy traffic on the line in large fleets. A disadvantage here is that there may be boats above you feeding back bad air making it harder to get an accurate reading.

Going Head To Wind On the Line But at an End:

The leeward end is probably the easiest end to carry out this check as generally there is less traffic there. Go head to wind beside the pin and use the angle of your transom to the line to determine the favoured end. If the imaginary line at right angles to your heading is above the start boat the pin is favoured and vice versa if the line is behind the start boat.

This will also give you an idea about how favoured one end is from the other and if the bias is not that great you may decide to start a little away from the favoured end where the chances of a clear air start are greater.

Using Your Compass:

Sail accurately down and on the line from the boat end noting the compass heading, then add 90 degrees to that. 

The angle of the line must be compared with your measured True Wind Direction which you have ascertained by getting a head to wind reading.

One clear way of demonstrating this is if you have a shifty wind, with the line laid to be approximately on the average wind direction.

Say that the wind is periodically shifting ca. 10 degrees on either side of this mean direction.

When the wind is on its maximum left shift of 10 degrees, clearly the port end of the line is now favoured by that 10 degrees. Conversely, when the wind is on its maximum right shift of 10 degrees, the starboard end of the line is now favoured by that 10 degrees. 

Obviously, in a shifty wind, the wind direction measurement must be repeated at intervals, so that the changes in the line bias can be monitored and from this, a good attempt can be made to evaluate the best starting approach.

A Method to Use if You Don’t Have a Compass:

Often referred to as the Sheet and Cleat method. Once again, sail down the line from the start boat end and set your sails until they just start to luff. Either cleat them or take a note of exactly where the sheet is through the turning block. When you reach the other end of the line, tack or Gybe and head up the line in the opposite direction without adjusting the sheets. If the sails are luffing, the start boat end is favoured and if you need to let the sails out to get the telltales flying, the pin is favoured.

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SAILING TO WIN!